clintfbartonn
shepherdsongs:

I was driving past a business here in the Houston Heights, when I glimpsed this painted on the side of the building. I recognized that iconic WWII poster before I realized it was not just any woman, but 14 year old Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani girl who was attacked for wanting an education. The words next to her are her quote, ( “I don’t mind if I have to sit on the floor at school.) All I want is education. And I’m afraid of no one.”

shepherdsongs:

I was driving past a business here in the Houston Heights, when I glimpsed this painted on the side of the building. I recognized that iconic WWII poster before I realized it was not just any woman, but 14 year old Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani girl who was attacked for wanting an education. The words next to her are her quote, ( “I don’t mind if I have to sit on the floor at school.) All I want is education. And I’m afraid of no one.”

queerhawkeye

Reactions from people whose language I was trying to learn:

fatnajl:

linguisticsyall:

Germans: Oh you’re learning German? Hey, you’re not so bad at it. Don’t fuck it up though. 

French: About time you learned French. 

Russians, Koreans, Spanish-speakers: WOW YOU’RE LEARNING MY LANGUAGE? LET ME HELP YOU I CAN GET SOME MATERIALS FOR YOU AND RECOMMEND SOME SITES AND VIDEOS, DID YOU JUST SAY “HELLO” IN MY LANGUAGE? YOU ARE SO GREAT WOW I AM SO IMPRESSED

Dutch: but why would you do this

why would you do this

matadornetwork
matadornetwork:

THE PASSPORT YOU HOLD says a lot more than you may realize about your ability to travel. If like me you spend a lot of energy complaining about visa paperwork and the negotiation of access into countries, this inforgraphic might stop you in your tracks. Take a second to consider that so many people in the world face reduced freedom of movement, or no movement at all.
The team at GOOD created this infographic map. The colour-coded nations are ranked by the country’s residents power to travel overseas.
How privileged does your passport make you feel?

 From: Passports can be limiting // http://ift.tt/1rJhFLN

matadornetwork:

THE PASSPORT YOU HOLD says a lot more than you may realize about your ability to travel. If like me you spend a lot of energy complaining about visa paperwork and the negotiation of access into countries, this inforgraphic might stop you in your tracks. Take a second to consider that so many people in the world face reduced freedom of movement, or no movement at all.

The team at GOOD created this infographic map. The colour-coded nations are ranked by the country’s residents power to travel overseas.

How privileged does your passport make you feel?

GOOD_Passports889-1

image From: Passports can be limiting // http://ift.tt/1rJhFLN

weneeddiversebooks
My point was that in a country that has become so extraordinarily diverse, we still imagine a white writer as the universal writer – and that absurdity is becoming almost unsustainable. I visit high schools all the time. When I look at the kids that are coming up, they look nothing like the writers that we’re all running around calling the voice of this country. Despite what we would like to think, the lag time between what a culture recognizes as its country and what the country is, my brother, is quite extraordinary. Outside of a few strains, I feel like the literary apparatus still thinks of this country very much in the 1950s.
queerhawkeye

painted-bees:

Sak Yant or Yantra Tattooing are  believed to give the wearer magic powers associated with healing, luck, strength, and protection against evil.

You can get these here in thailand by a monk, they look beautiful but I’d never recommend it. Essentially, you’re making a pact with a spirit to protect you in exchange for sacrificing an activity or habit you may have previously enjoyed (the monk decides what this is, not you). These tattoos are contracts. 
 Breaking your side of the bargain may encourage the spirit to ‘punish’ you, and these contracts are not easily voided. 

adventuresinlearning

micdotcom:

15 powerful Jose Mujica quotes no other leader has the guts to say

"Modest yet bold, liberal and fun-loving."

Naming Uruguay the country of the year in 2013, the Economist may very well have described the rising nation’s head of state, President José “Pepe” Mujica.

Known for his unusual frankness, fiery oration and bold leadership to turn ideas into action, the 78-year-old leader possesses and practices the very characteristics that many world leaders fail to emulate. He has also garnered international acclaim for his progressive policies, down-to-earth personality and simple presentation, which has earned him a reputation as “the world’s poorest president.”

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